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1st Lake Blog

A Guide to the Remaining Parades of Mardi Gras 2018

The first big weekend of Mardi Gras has officially come and gone, but there are more parades to come! Your First Lake home is probably already filled with beads, toys, and dubloons, but we think you should add a shoe or purse to your Carnival collection. There are plenty of parades left on the schedule, so take a look at this day-by-day line-up, and prepare yourself for the last few days of Mardi Gras 2018!

Wednesday, February 7

Uptown New Orleans

Krewe of Druids [6:00 p.m.] 
The Krewe of Druids doesn’t host a coronation ball or post-parade celebration, and their riders’ identities are never revealed to the public. This 200-person parade-only Krewe starts rolling from the corner of Jefferson Avenue and Magazine Street. They ride the traditional Uptown route, heading down St. Charles Avenue towards Canal Street downtown. Their final turn happens on the corner of Canal Street and South Peters Street.

Krewe of Nyx [7:30 p.m.]
The Krewe of Nyx parade will start immediately after Druids’ last float rolls. This all-female Krewe has grown in popularity since its founding in 2012. During the off-season, members spend their time hand-decorating the coveted Nyx Purse, which parade-goers vie for with comical signs and good old-fashioned pleading. Expect ornate floats, high-energy marching bands, and sequined handbags.

Thursday, February 8

Uptown New Orleans

The Knights of Babylon [5:30 p.m.]
The Knights of Babylon were established in 1939, and they’ve dedicated their parade to the preservation of traditional float design. The parade is lit by flambeauxs and their King’s float is still pulled by mules. The Knights of Babylon is the first parade of the night, and it starts on the corner of Magazine Street and Napoleon Avenue. It will follow the traditional St. Charles Avenue route to Canal Street downtown, where it will conclude.

The Knights of Chaos [6:15 p.m.]
Immediately following the Knights of Babylon are the Knights of Chaos. Much like Druids, the Knights of Chaos never reveal their riders’ identities, and their theme is only revealed once they start rolling.

Krewe of Muses [6:30 p.m.]
Established in 2000, the all-female Krewe of Muses is Thursday’s most-anticipated parade. The reason? Hand-decorated high heels! The Muses Shoe is considered a collector’s item to many Mardi Gras fans. The local, social, political commentary of this parade has become a major crowd pleaser, and their new signature float – a string of larger-than-life yellow rubber duckies – is a can’t-miss sight. If you want to get a Muses Shoe, a clever sign will help!

Who’s behind the mask? You’ll never find out!

Friday, February 9

Uptown New Orleans

Krewe of Hermes [6:00 p.m.]
Hermes was founded during the Great Depression to help ease the suffering of New Orleans’ most vulnerable. Named after the “winged courier of the gods,” Hermes is led down St. Charles Avenue by its costumed Captain.

Krewe d’Etat [6:30 p.m.]
The most satirical parade of the night belongs to the mysterious Krewe d’Etat. Their traditional floats are covered with sarcastic captions, outrageous props, and mildly inappropriate depictions of current events. Their Captains ride on horseback, their riders dress as skeletons, and their signature throw is a blinking skull bead.

Krewe of Morpheus [7:00 p.m.]
The final parade of Friday night, Morpheus, was established in 2000 as an inclusive Krewe that welcomes all interested riders to join. They aim to provide paradegoers with a traditional Mardi Gras experience. Morpheus starts on the corner of Jefferson and Magazine Street before heading up Napoleon and continuing down St. Charles Avenue.

Saturday, February 10

Uptown New Orleans

Krewe of Iris [11:00 a.m.]
The Krewe of Iris was formed in 1917, making it one of the oldest Krewes of Mardi Gras. The all-female parade boasts over 1500 members, and they uphold the traditional mystique of Mardi Gras by hiding their faces and wearing clean, white gloves. Isis’ route is a little different from its predecessors. It begins on Napoleon Avenue above St. Charles Avenue and turns left onto St. Charles instead of coming up from Magazine.

Krewe of Tucks [12:00 p.m.]
The Krewe of Tucks is the brainchild of a group of college students. Two Loyola New Orleans wanted to reignite the legacy of a defunct Uptown bar – named Tucks – as a new Mardi Gras Krewe. This wild and raucous daytime parade has a few handy signature throws  – Tucks-printed toilet paper and hand-decorated plungers. Paradegoers can expect rolls to fly over the oak tree branches on St. Charles Avenue resulting in a teepee’d stretch of New Orleans most iconic street.

Mid-City New Orleans

Krewe of Endymion [4:15 p.m.]
The culmination of Saturday’s parade line-up is the Krewe of Endymion. Considered one of Mardi Gras’ “Super Krewes,” the Krewe of Endymion pulls out all of the stops for their nighttime parade. Not only do they host an array of celebrity guests, their floats are some of the most spectacular creations to roll each year. Their signature float is also Mardi Gras’ largest creation. The extravagant and wildly popular Pontchartrain Beach float has nine sections and holds 300 of their 3,000 riders. This mega-parade starts on Orleans Avenue in Mid-City, turns down Carrollton, then heads downtown on Canal Street before pulling into the Mercedes-Benz Superdome for the Endymion Extravagana.

Sunday, February 11

Uptown New Orleans

Krewe of Okeanos [11:00 a.m.]
Be on the lookout for Okeanos’ Captain and King. Their intricate costumes are one of the parade’s many highlights! Catch the first parade of the day on St. Charles Avenue or anywhere downtown.

Krewe of Mid-City [11:45 a.m.]
This day parade is a delight to paradegoers young and old. Mid-City dedicates its parade to childlike wonder and joy, and every year they invite a boy and girl from the local Ronald McDonald House to serve as King and Queen of their parade. See this enchanting parade roll right after Okeanos.

Marching bands always get the crowd going!

Krewe of Thoth [12:oo p.m.]
The Krewe of Thoth is one of the longest parades of Mardi Gras. With over 1600 riders and a float count around 50 annually, Thoth is also one the largest. Thoth’s route begins near Audubon Park on Tchoupitoulas Street before snaking its way up Henry Clay Avenue to Magazine Street and then to Napoleon Ave.

Krewe of Bacchus [5:15 p.m.]
Super Krewe number two, Krewe of Bacchus, and its 1,000-member group are the last to roll on Sunday. The nighttime parade is a tribute to the god of wine, and it is one of Carnival’s most outrageous parades. The massive floats of Bacchus include two very famous primates, King and Queen Kong, and paradegoers are often seen slinging their beads back at the two rolling statues.

Monday, February 12 (Lundi Gras)

Uptown New Orleans

Krewe of Proteus [5:15 p.m.]
The Krewe of Proteus is the second-oldest Mardi Gras Krewe still in operation. Named after Poseidon’s son, Proteus is best known for its nautical-themed throws and its signature seashell float.

Krewe of Orpheus [6:00 p.m.]
Founded in 1993 by members that included legendary New Orleans musicians, Harry Connick and his son, Harry Connick Jr., this Lundi Gras Super Krewe lights up St. Charles Avenue with its bouquet-like floats. Orpheus is best known for its massive floral decor and signature float, The Smoky Mary – a high-tech locomotive-themed float complete with steaming action. Orpheus takes a slightly different route once it arrives downtown, though. Instead of stopping just after turning onto South Peters Street, Orpheus continues through the business district and into the convention center.

Tuesday, February 13 (Mardi Gras Day)

Uptown New Orleans

Krewe of Zulu [8:00 a.m.]
Coconuts! Get your Zulu Coconuts! The early morning Krewe of Zulu parade kicks off Fat Tuesday’s festivities in Central City. The parade works its way down Jackson Avenue to St. Charles Avenue where it turns and heads downtown. Upon reaching Canal Street, the parade takes a left turn up Canal and towards Basin Street. From there, Zulu winds its way up Basin to Orleans Avenue until it reaches its headquarters, the Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club.

Try to get your hands on a Zulu Coconut, which is hand-painted by their members.

Krewe of Rex [10:00 a.m.]
The grandfather to some of Mardi Gras’ oldest-held traditions, the Krewe of Rex is the last major parade to roll on Mardi Gras Day. This Krewe is responsible for the establishment of Mardi Gras’ signature colors and the creation of the coveted Mardi Gras doubloon. Every year, Rex throws collectible float beads with pendants that represent each float’s theme. Please note: Rex actually rolls on the opposite side of St. Charles Avenue, which houses the mansion they toast from each year.